Metadata is structured data which describes the characteristics of a resource. It shares many similar characteristics to the cataloguing that takes place in libraries, museums and archives. The term “meta” derives from the Greek word denoting a nature of a higher order or more fundamental kind. A metadata record consists of a number of pre-defined elements representing specific attributes of a resource, and each element can have one or more values.

Each metadata schema will usually have the following characteristics:

  • a limited number of elements
  • the name of each element
  • the meaning of each element

Typically, the semantics is descriptive of the contents, location, physical attributes, type (e.g. text or image, map or model) and form (e.g. print copy, electronic file). Key metadata elements supporting access to published documents include the originator of a work, its title, when and where it was published and the subject areas it covers. Where the information is issued in analog form, such as print material, additional metadata is provided to assist in the location of the information, e.g. call numbers used in libraries. The resource community may also define some logical grouping of the elements or leave it to the encoding scheme. For example, Dublin Core may provide the core to which extensions may be added.

Resource: 

http://www.library.uq.edu.au

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